2015
  • AACH rebrands to Bridges to Independence
2013
  • AACH partners with Virginia
    4-H and Smithsonian Institution to refocus and expand youth programs
  • Focus: character development, career development and academic achievement

2010–2012
  • Training facility kicks-off in LifeWorks Building
  • Video conferencing utilized for case management and remote training
2009
  • Homeless prevention and micro-business programs launch
  • LifeWorks expands through partnership with GMU

2006–2007
  • Significant IT upgrades to manage client records and more
  • AACH joins other providers to establish centralized continuum of care consortium
  • Michael O’Rourke hired as 3rd Executive Director
2005
  • SAFE AT HOME Kickball Benefit kicks-off

2002
  • Ed Rea hired as Executive Director
1998
  • SKIT launches with ear-mark through Virginia Department of Social Services
  • Case managers hired to work with children and youth

1997
  • AACH purchases 932 North Highland through ear-mark arranged by Rep. Jim Moran
  • HUD funding expands scope of Adopt-A-Family
1991–1993
  • Adopt-A-Family expands to include clients from both Alexandria & Arlington

1991
  • Shelter renovations following fire
  • Capacity increases to 50 beds
1989
  • Shelter operations move to present location (42-bed capacity)

1987–1988
  • Adopt-A-Family launches to transition families to apartments
  • LifeWorks program launches to provide employment services
  • Shelter named Sullivan House after Rosemari Sullivan, a founding board member
1986
  • 20-bed shelter opens on Fairfax Drive for single men/woman & families

1985
  • AACH founded with funding from government and churches